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3 traits of highly enlightened leaders

Saturday, May 30, 2015  
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By Tricia Molloy

"If I could define enlightenment briefly, I would say it is the quiet acceptance of what is." — Wayne Dyer

The dictionary defines "enlightened" as "someone who is free from illusion." So, my question to you is: What illusions, fears, limiting beliefs and self-defeating habits are you holding on to that are keeping you from being your best? It's time to release them.

Related: Risky busy-ness: Do less and accomplish more

As I speak to organizations and mentor business leaders, I have found that enlightened professionals share three common characteristics:

1. They trust in their innate wisdom to make conscious choices based on their awareness.

Enlightened leaders use wise strategies like affirmations, mindfulnessand meditation. Theypay attention to their intuition and to synchronicities to help guide them.

2. They live and work on purpose.

The most effective leaders have a clear, written life purpose statement — the reason they are here — and express that purpose often through the work they do and by serving others. It's what they are most passionate about and what gives them joy. It's what they would do regardless of compensation.

3. They have a high "prosperity consciousness."

They know without a doubt that there is more than enough to go around. They naturally cooperate and collaborate instead of compete with others who share the same objectives. They look for win-win opportunities and always find the time to offer advice and mentor others.

I believe we all have moments of enlightenment when we are aware, on purpose and connected with our prosperity consciousness. And each time we express it, we inspire others to do the same.

What is one enlightened thing you can do today?

Tricia Molloy is a leadership speaker and author of  Working with Wisdom. She works to inspire professionals to be more positive and productive through keynote speeches, employee talks, workshops and webinars.

Views expressed in blogs, posts and user comments are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Network of Executive Women or its Officers, Board members and corporate partners.

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