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Next Gen

Colleagues have asked for help in finding a mentor. If only I could jump onto Amazon and order one.
Many women still don’t negotiate. Or make counter offers. Many don’t like to say, “No.” We are often reluctant to ruffle feathers. The problem: Being uncomfortable or unwilling to negotiate is one factor contributing to the gender pay gap.
Imagine you had the opportunity to sit down with a senior executive and get the straight-up truth about what it takes to stand out as a leader in today’s highly competitive workforce.
In my first week of work at my summer internship between my first and second year of business school, I received some of the best career advice I’ve ever gotten from a boss.
“You are too shy, too quiet. You don’t speak up in meetings and no one knows what you do or who you are outside of our immediate team. I don’t think you can be a manager here.”
As a wide-eyed college graduate beginning my “real” career 10 years ago, I assumed I would start my new job with a blank slate. But after walking through the door to my future that day, I realized my colleagues had preconceptions about me, and my “millennial work ethic.”
We all encounter difficult people or situations that leave us frustrated, especially as we’re trying to get more done with fewer resources. Fortunately, you get to choose how you want to show up regardless of how others show up.
This blog’s headline is not “Dealing with difficult people.” It’s about “difficult conversations.” Don’t think there’s a difference? Then you might find some surprises here.  
Whenever I speak or teach, someone in the audience asks about my journey to finding my professional purpose. Of course, we often look to others’ experiences as a guide — why and how did you do that? And what, if anything, can I learn from it?
The gender pay gap in Hollywood became headline news when Jennifer Lawrence published a provocative blog piece about the disparity in wages for women in Hollywood.