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Communicating

Great leaders create an environment in which employees feel inspired and empowered.
Companies can drive workplace equality by understanding each gender's styles.
Race. Racism. Bias. Privilege. Words that provoke powerful emotion in almost every American.
Hands shaking? Technology glitch? Drawing a blank? Here's what to do.
In the mid-1950s, Ella Fitzgerald was a rising female vocalist. Her sultry sound was new and fresh. There was just one problem: Ella could not get booked at many of the hottest nightclubs because she was black.
I am one of the lucky ones. The commute to my office is less than a minute, usually in slippers.
“Women err on the side of being ineffectually humble, men err on the side of being self-aggrandizing,” communication expert Pe
“Great communicators are made – they’re not born,” executive coach Stanley Zareff told NEW Summit Speaker Series attendees, April 12, 2017.
“The first difficult conversation you need to have is with yourself, the same way you would with your team,” Stacie Behler, group vice president of public affairs and communication, Meijer Inc., told NEW Leadership Academy participants.
“You can’t do it.” “You’re crazy.” “You aren’t smart enough.” “You’re different and you don’t belong.” “It will never happen.” “Why do you want to do that?”