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Is your phone in charge? Hacks to take your life back

Woman staring at mobile phone

Whenever I talk to audiences about improving their work/life balance, we inevitably get into a discussion about our love/hate relationship with our digital devices. 

What was designed to make our lives easier has often become an addiction and an unhealthy excuse (ours and theirs) to be connected and available 24/7.

To ensure you are in control of this technology and it’s not controlling you, I recommend these best practices.

  • For a few days, keep track of all notifications and alerts you receive. Then, go to “Settings” to switch off the ones that are unnecessary distractions.
  • Charge your devices at night outside your bedroom so that you won’t be disturbed. That might mean recommissioning your nightstand alarm clock. This will also keep you from checking messages during the night or immediately upon wakening.
  • Delete any unused apps and, if you want to reduce your time on Facebook, consider removing that app from your phone and only connecting there from your desktop. (You can always add it back, if you experience severe withdrawal symptoms!)
  • Experiment with apps that support your goals to reduce stress, be more mindful and get organized. I did an informal survey of clients and colleagues for this list of apps to tap for better balance:

For meditation and mindfulness, try Headspace, Calm, Insight Timer, Simple Habit or Oprah & Deepak’s 21-Day Meditation Experience.

For improved focus and productivity, check out Noisli, Productive, focus@will, Nozbe, Habitica and Focus Booster.

You may also want to try Cozi for organizing your family schedules.

When it comes to enjoying better balance, these apps may help you outsmart your smart phone!

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Tricia Molloy is a leadership expert, former NEW Summit speaker and author of Working with Wisdom.

Views expressed in blogs, posts and user comments are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Network of Executive Women or its Officers, Board members and corporate partners.